Contemporary Societies

(Revised 9/2014)

9. Contemporary Societies (3 semester hours). All individuals function within social frameworks. Courses in contemporary societies introduce students to the study of social groups, including social institutions and processes, the values and beliefs shared by their members, and the forces that mold and shape social groups. They prepare students to approach social phenomena of all kinds in an informed and critical way, and to describe, analyze, compare, and contrast them. Such study also provides students with new vantage points from which to view their own socio-cultural assumptions and traditions.

These courses, which treat contemporary societies, study an individual society or compare several societies. All explicitly attempt to deepen the students’ understanding of the cultural, political, economic, or social contexts that shape people’s lives. Their scope may be global or specific, but all courses that fulfill this requirement address social processes, institutions, values, forces, and beliefs.

Students who graduate with a major in anthropology, economics, international affairs, political science, psychology, or sociology are exempt from the contemporary societies requirement. Students may satisfy this 3-hour requirement by passing any course listed below. Students who take approved CU-Boulder course work to fulfill this requirement must take the course for a letter grade and receive a passing grade of D- or higher.

  • ANTH 1200-3 Culture and Power
  • BAKR 1600-3 Creating a Sustainable Future
  • COMM 1210-3 Perspectives on Human Communication
  • ECON 2010-4 Principles of Microeconomics
  • ECON 2020-4 Principles of Macroeconomics
  • ECON 3403-3 International Economics and Policy
  • ECON 3535-3 Natural Resource Economics
  • ECON 3545-3 Environmental Economics
  • EDUC 3013-(3-4) School and Society
  • ETHN 1025-3 Introduction to Asian American Studies (formerly AAST 1015)
  • ETHN 2232-3 Contemporary African American Social Movements (formerly BLST 2200)
  • ETHN 2242-3 African American Social and Political Thought (formerly BLST 2210)
  • ETHN 3015-3 Asian Pacific American Communities (formerly AAST 3013)
  • GEOG 3742-3 Place, Power, and Contemporary Culture
  • GRMN 1601-3 Germany Today
  • HIST 2126-3 Modern U.S. Politics and Diplomacy
  • HIST 2166-3 The Vietnam Wars
  • HUMN 4835-3 Literature and Social Violence
  • IAFS 1000-4 Global Issues and International Affairs
  • IAFS/JWST 4302-3 Justice, Human Rights and Democracy in Israel
  • INVS 3000-(3-4) Innovative Approaches to Contemporary Issues Through Service Learning
  • INVS 4302/PSCI 4732-3 Critical Thinking in Development
  • ITAL 1500-3 ”That’s Amoré”: Introduction to Italian Culture
  • ITAL 4290-3 Italian Culture through Cinema
  • LIBB 2100-3 Russian Revolutions: Social and Artistic
  • LING 1000-3 Language in U.S. Society
  • PRLC 1820-3 Community Issues in Leadership
  • PSCI 1101-3 American Political System
  • PSCI 2012-3 Introduction to Comparative Politics
  • PSCI 2223-3 Introduction to International Relations
  • PSCI 3022-3 Russian Politics
  • PSCI 3032-3 Democracy, Inequality and Violence in Latin America
  • PSCI 3074-3 Democracy and Its Citizens in the U.S. and the EU
  • PSCI 3082-3 Political Systems of Sub-Saharan Africa
  • PSCI 3143-3 Current Affairs in International Relations
  • PSCI 4002-3 Western European Politics
  • PSCI 4012-3 Global Development
  • PSCI 4062-3 Emerging Democracies of Central and East Europe
  • PSCI 4272-3 The Political Economy of Advanced Industrial Democracies
  • PSYC 2606-3 Social Psychology
  • RLST 1850-3 Ritual and Media
  • RLST 2400-3 Religion and Contemporary Society
  • RUSS 2501-3 Russia Today
  • RUSS 4831-3 Contemporary Russian Literature
  • SCAN 2201-3 Introduction to Modern Scandinavian Culture and Society
  • SCAN 3201-3 Contemporary Nordic Society and Culture
  • SLHS 1010-3 Disabilities in Contemporary American Society
  • SOCY 1001-3 Introduction to Sociology
  • SOCY 4024-3 Juvenile Justice and Delinquency
  • WMST 2600-3 Gender, Race, and Class in a Global Context