Slide 1

You run for your health, they flee zombies

Sure, there are endorphin junkies who love to enter the ‘pain cave,’ but for those who’d rather play, fleeing from ‘zombies’ does the trick, CU-Boulder researchers find.

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Slide 2

Citizen ‘sparkplugs’ can reduce red-zone fire danger

Researchers at the University of Colorado Boulder recently examined the aftermath of two catastrophic conflagrations and found an unexpected ally in wildfire-education efforts, the “citizen entrepreneur.”

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Slide 3

Alums give back to CU, city in multiple ways

Sue Baer loves to write, loves children and wants to help others. So it’s no surprise that her newest children’s book tackles a grown-up issue: children with autism. It’s one of many ways she and her husband, Barry, use their time and resources in the service of others.

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Slide 4

Classically trained artist is über-cool icon

Lisa Solberg's performance installation art, which clearly is not boring, is a natural evolution. “Art is actually life, and I think most people are yearning for a change in perspective, a jolt of inspiration, a fresh breath of air. I strive to make art that would evoke a similar shock to jumping in an ice-cold body of water.”

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Slide 5

Pioneering prof wins prestigious Grawemeyer Award

University of Colorado Boulder scientist Steven Maier, who discovered a brain mechanism that not only produces resilience to trauma but aids in coping with future adversity, has won the 2016 University of Louisville Grawemeyer Award for Psychology. The award is among the most prestigious in the field of psychology and comes with a no-strings-attached $100,000 prize.

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Features

Are you happy now? Enjoy your (likely) long life

Are you happy now? Enjoy your (likely) long life

Some peer-reviewed studies have found that happy people tend to live longer than their less-happy counterparts. But now, for the first time, researchers have found that happiness all by itself—regardless of marital status, income, physical health and other indicators—is a key factor in longevity.

Profs find few benefits, some harm in ‘voluntourism’

Profs find few benefits, some harm in ‘voluntourism’

Generally, ‘voluntourism’ is a poor substitute for traditional development work. Most projects are short-term, organizations that promote voluntouring don’t always ‘understand the place where it happens,’ and travelers typically don’t have skills needed for particular projects, researchers find.

CU research IDs new strategy to fight species extinction

CU research IDs new strategy to fight species extinction

The go-to-strategy for rescuing threatened species has long been to set aside tracts of healthy land to spread out in, and migration corridors that allow them to mix with other populations, gaining resilience via a broadened gene pool. Because habitat preservation isn’t always viable, introducing genetic diversity might keep threatened species viable, scientists find.

Major gift to SEEC caps decades of service, giving

Major gift to SEEC caps decades of service, giving

Following four decades of service in a host of roles and several gifts to CU, Bob and Nancy Sievers have made a major capstone contribution to advance the development of the new laboratory and office complex dedicated to sustainability, energy and environmental research.