Slide 1

CU researchers ID CPR ‘hot spots’

Receiving bystander CPR can double or triple a victim’s chance of survival, according to the American Heart Association. But if you’re the victim, you have a better chance of receiving CPR from a bystander in Denver’s Capitol Hill neighborhood than in Five Points. New CU research aims to put resources in the neighborhoods that need it most.

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Slide 2

Vertebrates built new heads from old parts, study suggests

During the evolution of invertebrates like amphioxus into vertebrates like fish, a remarkable structure appeared: the head. How, exactly, the head evolved has long been a mystery, but scientists postulated that skulls were built from fundamentally new tissue. Now, CU-Boulder research suggests that skull tissue was actually built from existing tissues never before found in invertebrates.

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Slide 3

Spruce bark beetle outbreaks hurt squirrel populations

In an undergraduate research effort, recent graduate Brian Hankinson found that squirrel populations decrease in areas with an increase in beetle-kill trees. The squirrels, primarily seed-consumers, were observed eating beetle larvae from infected Engelmann spruce trees. However, the squirrels weren’t able to glean enough nutritional substance from feeding on the beetle larvae to maintain their population.

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Slide 4

Philosopher’s aim: doing justice to Aristotle’s ethics

Aristotle may be the most influential philosopher in history, a cornerstone of Western philosophy. But at a time when many see the pursuit of money as a virtue in itself, some might dismiss him as an old Greek hippie. Mitzi Lee, associate professor of philosophy, has developed “creative and persuasive” ideas about understanding Aristotle, and she’s won a National Endowment for the Humanities fellowship to complete a book about justice as it relates to Aristotle’s ideas on ethics—and how to live a good life.

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Features

Student broadens insight into piñon-juniper lands

Student broadens insight into piñon-juniper lands

Millions of acres of piñon-juniper woodlands have been intensively managed since 1950. The consequences of those actions are still poorly understood, but Miranda Redmond, a CU-Boulder doctoral student has been working hard to change that.

Liberal-arts students get down to business

Liberal-arts students get down to business

More than 600 non-business students are enrolled in the integrative business minor program at the University of Colorado Boulder. The program debuted its slimmed-down curriculum in fall 2013. The popular program is exceeding enrollment projections.

Mexican immigrants in ’20s tended to be wealthy

Mexican immigrants in ’20s tended to be wealthy

U.S.-Mexico border manifests from the 1920s indicate that Mexicans migrating to the United States then tended to be healthier and wealthier than those who stayed home, CU researchers report. They say the findings have implications for contemporary policy.

Ketchum Arts & Sciences undergoing major renovation

Ketchum Arts & Sciences undergoing major renovation

Thomas Edison said genius was “1 percent inspiration and 99 percent perspiration.” For 77 years, summer work and study in CU-Boulder’s Ketchum Arts and Sciences building was sweaty. Thanks to a major renovation, that and other deficiencies are being fixed.