Slide 1

Kids weave tales of snakes and eagles and bears

Two first graders walk into a class. They open a science book they wrote together. They read it aloud to college students, who clap and ask questions. This is no joke. It’s a joint effort of a science-writing class at CU-Boulder and a first-grade class at Bear Creek Elementary School.

Read full story here

Slide 2

Biblical scholar explores the power of Babel

Modern readers of the Holy Bible—both the Hebrew Bible and New Testament—often say that context is critical. Samuel Boyd, assistant professor of religious studies at the University of Colorado Boulder, heartily agrees. And he should know. He has no fewer than 23 ancient Near East tongues at his disposal, including four dialects of both Hebrew and Aramaic—the language of Jesus—and two each of Greek and Babylonian, not to mention Hittite, Ugaritic, Ethiopic, Punic and others.

Read full story here

Slide 3

SEEC positions CU as global hub for Earth research

The newly completed Sustainability, Energy and Environment Complex “establishes CU-Boulder as the epicenter for environmental sciences and geosciences research nationally and perhaps worldwide,” says Provost Russ Moore. The center was officially dedicated this month.

Read full story here

Slide 4

Rising-star scientist got her start at CU-Boulder

Disbelief still lingers in Allison Cleary’s voice months after winning the grand prize in the 2015 SciLifeLab Prize for Young Scientists. Cleary, who is completing a combined MD/PhD program, received the award, which includes a cash prize, a trip to Sweden and publication in an esteemed journal, for an essay she wrote about the physiology of breast cancer titled, “Teamwork: the tumor cell edition.”

Read full story here

Slide 5

Classics unfazed by the ‘crisis in humanities’

In the headlines, the words “humanities” and “crisis” are so commonly conjoined that you’d think that college courses on human thought, experience and creativity are collapsing like the Roman Empire. The story has more nuance than the headline, as the Classics Department at the University of Colorado Boulder illustrates.

Read full story here

Features

In science, many are blinded by gender stereotype

In science, many are blinded by gender stereotype

Finding a dearth of rigorous research into gender biases, researchers designed two studies to examine “whether subtle variations in feminine appearance erroneously convey a woman’s likelihood of being a scientist.” The answer, they found, was “yes.”

Adolescent caffeine use may raise anxiety-disorder risk

Adolescent caffeine use may raise anxiety-disorder risk

Many have felt the jitters of too much caffeine, but new evidence suggests that such consumption puts adolescents at risk of suffering those symptoms on a daily basis, even after discontinuing use, a CU-Boulder research team has found.

Prof’s class examines the sociology of yoga

Prof’s class examines the sociology of yoga

Professor Lori M. Hunter has spent a semester prompting students to grapple with questions about the intersection of society and yoga. The course, which she believes is the first of its kind, is an upper-division class designed to hone students’ critical-thinking-skills.

Much ado about something, four centuries later

Much ado about something, four centuries later

On the 400th anniversary of the Bard’s death this year, the campus is staging two significant Shakespearean events. In its 59th season, the Colorado Shakespeare Festival will move closer to performing all of Shakespeare’s canon for the second time—a feat most companies have yet to achieve once. And the famous published edition of Shakespeare’s collected plays, printed in 1623, will be exhibited on campus.