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Stopping Cancers Knock on the door

Assessing water in High Asia, upon which millions depend

Content Image InlineWhile about one-third of the world’s population depends to some degree on fresh water within the High Asia hydrological system, there’s little data on the resources now or projections for future. CU-Boulder researchers are on a four-year quest to bring clarity to the situation today and more accuracy to projections for the future.

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Who speaks for the climate? A host of confusing voices

Content Image InlineFew people start the day with a stout cup of coffee and a fresh scientific journal. Most follow news in politics and science through the lens of the mass media. As media coverage rises, falls and varies in quality, public understanding has often been affected, CU expert finds.

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As climate changes, gender could shape human migration

Content Image InlineSocial scientists are grappling with how humans are likely to adapt to drought and other results of the changing climate, and they have begun studying the potential for climate-related migration. What they have largely not done is to investigate how differently that migration will affect men and women. A CU sociologist and population expert sees likely gender differences in climate migration and is studying the dynamics now.

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Ex auto mechanic makes splash in world of history

Content Image InlineIf the world ever takes a swift, downward trip in a hand basket, historian Elizabeth “Lil” Fenn feels pretty good about her chances. Before entering academic life, she lived on the land and became an auto mechanic. She notes an old tradition among academics who were trained in the trades. Fenn, who joins the CU faculty next year, is known for her acclaimed book “Pox Americana.”

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In other news

‘Pulling the teeth of the tropics’ but only for some

Long seen as a triumph of engineering and public-health management, the Panama Canal has broader lessons, CU historian argues. To help complete his account of the public-health implications of this episode, the National Institutes of Health is supporting his work.

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Pious Muslims, Christians distrust government

At least when it comes to ideas about government intervention on the economy—particularly the question of whether government should look out for the wellbeing of its people–Christian conservatives in America and devout Muslims the world over are more similar than different in their views. That’s a key finding of recently published work by two former CU researchers.

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Students seeing stars, learning film in Telluride

For the second year running, some CU students have gotten a front-row lesson in film and life at the Telluride Film Festival. Now, an educational program started by an instructor at CU’s Libby Arts Residential Academic Program has become a formal seminar for university students who watch and learn from some of the brightest lights in film.

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Kids facing hardships grow up faster and feel older

Many kids who face challenges—such as growing up in with limited resources, living in single-parent homes or feeling unsafe in schools or neighborhoods—actually experience a subjective age that is older than that of their peers, a CU sociologist’s award-winning research finds.

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A living space to honor a friend and talented artist

In 1988, Deborah Haynes interviewed with Antonette ‘Toni’ Rosato for a position as a professor of art and art history at CU-Boulder. Not only did Haynes land the job, she began one of the most meaningful friendships of her life. Now Haynes is honoring her late friend and colleague by naming a new sculpture studio after Rosato.

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