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Mercury spacecraft on crash course with history

NASA’s MESSENGER mission to Mercury carrying an $8.7 million University of Colorado Boulder instrument is slated to run out of fuel and crash into the planet in the coming days after a wildly successful, four-year orbiting mission chock full of discoveries.

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Just how important are nurturing environments?

By Hannah Fletcher Pioneering behavioral scientist Anthony Biglan will discuss how creating nurturing environments is key to raising better young citizens and building a healthier, happier and more prosperous Colorado and society as a whole on Monday, April 27. Hosted by the Center for the Study and Prevention of Violence at the University of Colorado […]

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Hubert Yin unlocks the power of toll-like receptors

Hubert Yin has been thinking about one type of cell receptor since he joined the BioFrontiers Institute, and it is a receptor worthy of that kind of time. Yin, an associate professor of chemistry and biochemistry, is focusing much of his research on toll-like receptors. These are pattern recognition receptors designed to identify pathogen signals and activate an immune response within the cell.

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STEM scholars probe efficacy of 'concept inventories'

The W. M. Keck Foundation has awarded a $300,000 grant to University of Colorado Boulder School of Education Professor Derek Briggs and CU Denver School of Education & Human Development Professor Bud Talbot and CU-Boulder Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology (MCDB) Instructor Jenny Knight to study the usefulness of popular “concept inventories” as assessments of undergraduate student learning.

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After '13 flood, fungi thrived in Colorado homes

Basements that flooded after heavy rains deluged the Colorado Front Range in September 2013 had higher levels of airborne mold and other fungi months after the waters receded compared with basements that didn’t flood, according to a study by the University of Colorado Boulder.

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Visiting scholar muses on life, memory and history

Why does a family save its papers?  How does the instinct for preservation defy wars, fire, and genocide; migration and conversion; family feuds; and even a stubborn disconnection from the past?  What do we preserve and what does it mean to those who find it? Sarah Abrevaya Stein, CU-Boulder’s Program in Jewish Studies’ 2015 Sondra […]

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